Workshop

Application-Only Graduate Student Workshop: Forced Migration in the 21st Century

The UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration invites graduate student applicants for an-all day workshop on Forced Migration: Causes, Consequences, Responses. Immediately preceding a two-day conference on the same topic, the workshop is designed to take advantage of the presence of an international and interdisciplinary group of refugee scholars to provide graduate-level instruction on this essential topic.

Thursday, April 13, 2023
9:30 AM - 5:00 PM (Pacific Time)Moore Hall, 3340 (SE&IS Reading Room)

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Special graduate student workshop:

Forced Migration in the 21st Century:  Causes, Consequences, Responses

Center for the Study of International Migration

Funded with the generous support of the Luskin Endowment for Thought Leadership

 

 Thursday, April 13, 2023 – Moore Hall, 3340 (SE&IS Reading Room)

 

            The UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration invites graduate student applicants for an-all day workshop on Forced Migration: Causes, Consequences, Responses.  Immediately preceding a two day conference on the same topic, the workshop is designed to take advantage of the presence of an international and interdisciplinary group of refugee scholars to provide graduate-level instruction on this essential topic. 

 

            The workshop will be led by three visitors:  Tamirace Fakhoury, Associate Professor of Political Science and Global Migration Studies, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark; Gioconda Herrera, Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales FLACSO in Quito/Ecuador.  and Marta Pachocka, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Studies, SGH Warsaw School of Economics. The workshop will focus broadly on refugee politics and migration governance in global perspective, examining the phenomenon in Latin America, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe.

A detailed description of each workshop, with background readings, follows below.

 

            The workshop is designed for graduate students at any level across the social sciences.   While the workshop is particularly oriented towards students currently working on issues related to forced migration or planning to do so in the future, it will be entirely relevant to students on any range of migration phenomena.   The workshop is open to graduate students from any institution in southern California, though priority will be given to UCLA graduate students.

 

To ensure that numbers remain appropriate for seminar-style participation, participation will be by application only.  Students should upload a one page letter describing your research interests and the reasons why you wish to participate in the workshop, along with a one page c.v. at the following sitehttps://ucla.in/3J8Jbi9.           

 

The deadline for submission is Monday, March 27, 2023. Lunch will be served.  While participants are encouraged to attend all sessions, we understand that schedules may not permit.  If attendance throughout the day is not feasible, applicants should indicate which sessions they plan to attend.

 


 

Program and Readings

 

(All readings will be made available to workshop participants)

9:30- 11:30:   Polycentric Governance and Refugee politics in the Middle East: Historical Legacies and Governance Dilemmas

Tamirace Fakhoury, Associate Professor of Political Science and Global Migration Studies, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark

This session focuses on the historical and policy legacies that have shaped refugee politics in the Middle East before zooming in on the newer case of largescale displacement from Syria. Adopting a polycentric governance lens, the session will first look into the complex architecture of actors and practices that has shaped refugee governance in the Middle East, then turning to the newer case of displacement from Syria as an important field of empirical inquiry. More specifically, we unpack how multi-level actors including the UNHCR, the European Union, the Arab League and the Gulf Cooperation Council have collaborated and clashed on the refugee response and what dilemmas these push-and-pull-dynamics have generated for refugee policymaking and protection.

Readings


11:30-12:30: Lunch

 

12:30-2:30:  Forced Migration Governance in Poland

Marta Pachocka, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Studies, SGH Warsaw School of Economics

It has been a little more than a year since Russia’s full-scale aggression against Ukraine at the end of February 2022, which caused massive internal displacement in Ukraine and unprecedented forced (refugee) migration to neighboring countries. As reported by the UNHCR, Poland has been the main host country since the beginning of the war, both in terms of the scale of border crossings from Ukraine and people registered for “European” temporary protection or similar national protection schemes. The most significant influx of forced migrants occurred in March 2022; in later months, the influx was much smaller. According to data from November 15, 2022, the number of registered border crossings from Ukraine to Poland has amounted to 7.58 million, and from Poland to Ukraine 5.53 million, which also indicates a possible high return migration. This interactive workshop aims to show Poland’s response to these events, mapping key state and non-state actors and their roles in 2022 (including public administration, social organizations, international organizations, etc.). We will also explore the current state of play and future challenges. Against this background, it is worth discussing the change of Poland’s migration status from an emigration country to a new immigration country in Europe in a situation where Poland does not have an official migration strategy.

 

Readings:

 

2:30-3:00 Break

 

3:00 – 5:00  Transnational Families, Forced Migration and Immobility in the Americas

Gioconda Herrera, Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales FLACSO in Quito/Ecuador

This workshop will discuss the role of transnational families in the context of forced return or forced immobility such as deportation, detention or confinements. We will explore the circulation of materiality, information and emotions in contexts of little or no mobility such as the ones brought by restrictive migration policies or by the Covid-19. We will look at how family ties may act as support in times of immobility but also at the conflicts and breakups that may emerge within these families. We will see how members of transnational families reconfigure their social and particularly gender relationships, and how those reconfigurations influence integration or estrangement in post deportation scenarios or other type of immobility crises.  We will also discuss the particular configurations of transnational social relations that frame experiences of detention, deportation, return, reintegration and future mobility patterns and life chances.

 

Readings:

  • Ulla Berg and Gioconda Herrera, “Emotions, Inequalities and Crises: Ecuadorian Migrants in Europe during the COVID-19 Pandemic”,  International Migration  (First online publication: October, 17, 2022).
  • Gioconda Herrera et al, “Transnational Families and Return in the Age of Deportation: The case of Indigenous Ecuadorian Migrants”. Global Networks.  22:1, Pgs. 36-50. 2022.
  • Gioconda Herrera and Ulla Berg, 2023.  “Vulnerability and (Im) mobilities: US Deportation and Post-deportation Lives Among Ecuadorian Transnational Families”.  Handbook of Transnational Families Around the World. Javiera Cienfuegos, Rosa Brandhosrt y Deborah Bryceson. (eds.)  Springer. 

 

The workshop is organized by the Center for the Study of International Migration, thanks to the very generous support of the Luskin Endowment for Thought Leadership.  Additional support is generously provided by the International Institute, the Department of Sociology,  the Center for European and Russian Studies, the Canadian Studies Center, The Promise Institute for Human Rights (UCLA School of Law), and the Latin American Institute.


Sponsor(s): Center for Study of International Migration, Latin American Institute, UCLA International Institute, Canadian Studies Program, Center for European and Russian Studies, The Promise Institute for Human Rights at UCLA School of Law