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2010 IGCC Dissertation Fellowships - $15,000 stipend, up to $3,000 travel/research (Deadline: 3/22/10)

IGCC seeks to support dissertations on three broad themes closely linked to this new global security dynamic: 1) The Changed Institutional Environment; 2)Nonconventional Threats, or 3) Nuclear Threats and Nuclear Energy. The international sources and/or consequences of the phenomenon studied in the dissertation must be an integral part of the project.

  • $16,000 Stipend, up to $4,000 in Research/Travel
  • (UCLA applicants: please contact your department fund manager to submit a Golden Rod form to the Office of Contracts and Grants with a copy of the proposal by March 22, 2010)
  • Online application system available here: http://igcc.ucsd.edu/application

For more information please contact IGCC directly http://igcc.ucsd.edu/cprograms/funding/df_app_menu.php 

The IGCC Research Agenda

International security in the twenty-first century has been transformed from a stark bipolar confrontation of states and their surrogates, characteristic of the Cold War, to interactions among a wide variety of actors and institutions. International and regional organizations, state and local government agencies, nonprofits, and the private sector play unprecedented roles in shaping security—positively or negatively. Climate change and hunger, unemployment and migration, financial instability and natural resource constraints create a rapidly changing strategic environment, challenging old definitions of what security means, who is or should be involved, and what role national governments play. Local choices can have international consequences. For example, nuclear power may offer a way for nations to free themselves from the tyranny of oil and assist in addressing threats of destabilizing climate change, but the risks of diversion of nuclear material from civilian to weapons use remain high. Governments will soon face this environment with significantly reduced budgets, forcing hard decisions as they set security priorities.

IGCC seeks to support dissertations on three broad themes closely linked to this new global security dynamic. The international sources and/or consequences of the phenomenon studied in the dissertation must be an integral part of the project.

Theme One: The Changed Institutional Environment:
Although national governments remain primary players in the security realm, regional and multilateral forums have become an increasingly important mechanism for managing international relations and preserving the peace. Governments frequently work through international organizations, corporations, and NGOs abroad, and state and local partners at home.

Theme Two: Nonconventional Threats:
Although peer competitors remain, day-to-day threats in this new security dynamic generally emanate from a variety of nontraditional sources such as terrorism and international crime, bioterrorism and nuclear proliferation, climate change and epidemics that straddle borders.

Theme Three: Nuclear Threats and Nuclear Energy:
The continued role of nuclear technology in weapons development as well as civilian energy production and other civilian technologies makes nuclear issues a persistent policy concern. The proliferation of nuclear weapons and fissile material remains a grave threat to international security and has intensified the potential threat of nuclear terrorism by non-state actors.

Application:

Access IGCC's Online Application Tool here: http://igcc.ucsd.edu/application/ 

Remember, your application must be submitted directly to IGCC by the due date to be included with the application for review. [IMPORTANT: if you are affiliated with UCLA there is an extra step for your application. You will need to contact your department's Finance Manager and complete a Goldenrod Form, which must be attached to a copy of your final proposal and delivered to the UCLA Contracts and Grants Office ( UCLA Wilshire Center, Suite 1200, Los Angeles, CA 90095 ) by March 22, 2010.]

Please direct questions to: igcc-cp@ucsd.edu

The Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation (IGCC) is a multi-campus research unit (MRU) of the University of California system. The IGCC Washington office was established in March 1997 to develop programs & projects to promote closer links with the policy community and advance the research and educational opportunities for scholars in international affairs throughout the UC system. 

Important -- DO NOT send your application to the Burkle Center. This grant is made possible by IGCC, please direct all questions to IGCC.

Burkle Center for International Relations