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Voices from the Empire: Japanese Colonialism and its Legacy

Seventh Annual Graduate Student Symposium for Japanese Studies, May 6, 2000.

Japan's colonialism impacted all of Asia and more than half a century later still marks the landscape of Asian politics and popular culture, as well as economic and military policies in the region. This symposium investigated the responses of colonized people to Japanese imperialism during the colonial period as well as their reaction to their liberation. In addition to the reactions of the colonized, the responses of the Japanese public to their government's policies were also investigated.

Schedule

8:45 - 9:00

Opening Remarks
Fred G. Notehelfer, University of California, Los Angeles
Director of Center of Japanese Studies and Professor History

Literature and Music Panel

9:00 - 9:30

Complicity and Art in the Era of National Expansionism: Reconsidering Natsume Soseki
By John McClain, San Francisco State University

9:30 - 10:00

Modern Love in Manchuria: Race and Romance in Yokota Fumiko's 'Kobumi'
By Kimberly Kono, University of California, Berkeley

10:00 - 10:30

To Be or Not to Be Japanese: The Question of Identity in the Literature of Kim Saryang
By Christopher D. Scott, Stanford University

10:30 - 11:00

Music, Identities and Agendas: Japanese Colonialism and Pan-Asianism in Indonesia
By Kenneth Lawrence, University of Hawaii, Manoa

11:00 - 12:00

Comments by Edward Fowler, Professor of Japanese Literature University of California, Irvine
and Questions

History and Politics Panel

1:30 - 2:00

Another Voice of Empire: Enomoto Takeaki (1836-1908) and Maritime Expansion into the Pacific
By Todd Henry, University of California, Los Angeles

2:00 - 2:30

The South Manchuria Railway: Maps, Advertising and the Construction of an Empire
By John Treiber, University of Hawaii, Manoa

2:30 - 3:00

'Postmodernity' in Manchuria: Japanese Colonialism and the Absence of Nationality Law in Manzhouguo
By Taro Iwata, University of Oregon

3:00 - 3:30

Echo of the Empire: Japan's Relations with Southeast Asia, A Vietnamese Perspective
By Duong Quoc Thanh, University of Washington

3:30 - 4:30

Comments by Louise Young, Assistant Professor of History, New York
and Questions

4:30 - 4:45

Closing Remarks: Hajime Imamasa, Graduate Student in Department of Anthropology
University of California, Los Angeles

Terasaki Center for Japanese Studies