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Public Support for Global Climate Cooperation

Public Support for Global Climate Cooperation

This event is co-sponsored by the UCLA Department of Political Science Comparative Politics and International Relations workshops.

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Duration: 1:22:59

ABSTRACT

Climate change mitigation requires international cooperation and for this cooperation to be sustainable over the long term, formal global agreements to reduce CO2 emissions need broad public support. We provide estimates of the political demand for different types of climate agreements in France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We find that citizens' sentiment toward climate agreements most strongly depends on costs. Our results, however, also suggest that citizens are sensitive to the principles that govern the international distribution of costs, prefer more encompassing forms of climate cooperation, and support agreements that include a low sanction for failing emission reduction targets.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Michael Bechtel is an SNSF Professor at the University of St. Gallen's Department of Political Science. His research interests range across the fields of international relations, comparative politics, and electoral behavior. Current research projects examine the politics of natural disasters, the determinants of mass support for global climate cooperation, and individual preferences for financial bailouts.

Bechtel's research has been published in journals like American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, and other noted academic outlets. He is the author and co-author of two books on the politics of financial markets. Bechtel's research has been funded by fellowships and grants from institutions like the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Swiss Network for International Studies, and the German National Merit Foundation (CHF 1.8 million in total). His work has won several awards.

Bechtel holds a habilitation in political science from ETH Zurich (2012), a PhD in Political Science from the University of Konstanz (2008), and an MA in Political Science, Economics, and Public Law from the University of Freiburg (2005). He has been a visiting scholar at New York University, University of Oxford, and Yale University. Prior to his academic career, Bechtel was a professional soldier and infantry officer in the German forces.

Burkle Center for International Relations