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James S. Coleman Memorial Lecture: The Development and Democratic Challenges of Postcolonial Kenya

Dr. Paul Zeleza examines the forces and factors that led to the 2007 election violence in Kenya.

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Duration: 1:23:17

Dr. Paul Tiyambe Zeleza is dean of the Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts, and Presidential Professor of African American Studies and History, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles.

Dr. Zeleza previously was head of the Department of African American Studies and the Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Director of the Center for African Studies and Professor of History and African Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  He has taught at universities in the United States, Canada, Kenya, Jamaica, and Malawi.  He has also worked as a consultant for the Ford and MacArthur foundations and as an adviser to the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development. He was also a past president of the African Studies Association – the largest professional association dedicated to the study of Africa and the African Diaspora.

Dr. Zeleza earned his B.A. from the University of Malawi and an M.A from the University of London, where he studied African history and international relations.  He holds his Ph.D. in economic history from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Dr. Zeleza’s academic work has crossed traditional boundaries, ranging from history and economics to human rights and gender studies.  He has published scores of articles and authored or edited more than two dozen books and, and in 1994 was awarded the prestigious Noma Award for his book A Modern Economic History of Africa.  He also edits The Zeleza Post, an online source of news and commentary on the Pan-African world (www.zeleza.com).  His most recent book is titled Barack Obama and African Diasporas: Dialogues And Dissensions (Ohio University Press, 2009).

African Studies Center