Salvadoreñas: A “Story” of Female Agency and Nationhood Across Geographic and Imagined Borders

Salvadoreñas: A “Story” of Female Agency and Nationhood Across Geographic and Imagined Borders

Part of the LAI Working Group on Central American Feminisms. A discussion lead by Yajaira M. Padilla (University of Arkansas, Fayetteville) who will discuss her book.

Monday, June 02, 2014
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Royce Hall 314
UCLA

Abstract: In her talk, Dr. Padilla will discuss her book Changing Women, Changing Nation: Female Agency, Nationhood, and Identity in Trans-Salvadoran Narratives (SUNY 2012), which explores the literary representations of women in Salvadoran and US-Salvadoran narratives during the span of the last 30 years. Included in these narratives are texts produced during El Salvador’s civil war (1980-1992) and the current postwar period, as well as US-Salvadoran works of the last two decades that engage with the topic of migration and second-generation ethnic incorporation into the United States. Rather than think of these two sets of texts as constituting separate literatures, Dr. Padilla conceives of them as part of the same corpus, what she calls “trans-Salvadoran narratives.” As she ultimately argues, the representation of women in these trans-Salvadoran narratives not only provide a means of understanding women’s historical agency throughout this period and the ways in which their livelihoods have been affected by national and transnational processes, but also the ways in which the Salvadoran nation has been transformed.

Biography: Yajaira M. Padilla is an Associate Professor of English and Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. Her research centers on Central American cultural and literary studies and Central Americans in a US Latino context. She is the author of Changing Women, Changing Nation: Female Agency, Nationhood, and Identity in Trans-Salvadoran Narratives (SUNY 2012) and has published articles in Latin American Perspectives, Latino Studies, the Arizona Journal of Hispanic Cultural Studies, and Studies in 20th and 21st Century Literature. Currently, she is working on a new project on the politics of Central American “belonging” and “non-belonging” in the United States.

Cost: Free and open to the public

Special Instructions

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For more information please contact

Leisy Abrego Tel: 310-206-9414
abrego@ucla.edu

Download File: 06-02-14-Salvadorenas-5f-5rk.pdf

Sponsor(s): César E. Chávez Department of Chicana/o Studies, USEU (Unión Salvadoreña de Estudiantes Universitarios), and LAI Working Group on Central American Feminisms